9/25/21: “Superintendent” Ziegler is Weak and a Habitual Liar. Asks Loudoun Business Leaders to Help Protect Him Against “Detractors”

What kind of superintendent asks county business leaders to come to their rescue because they are being schooled and embarrassed EVERYDAY? We’ve proven over and over that Ziegler is a habitual liar even though he continues to try and convince anyone that will listen to him that LCPS is not reprogramming our students with radical CRT based material such as Second Step and Learning for Justice. Now this guy is trying to convince Loudoun business leaders that LCPS’s national exposure over the past year is just because of us detractors.

Personally, I’m flattered that Ziegler thinks all of us parents wield so much power over the media that we can control the narrative for a solid year. The truth is we don’t, however, we do have an appetite for truth, accountability, ethics, morals and we have used facts and evidence and this is what has been driving the media. What proof has Ziegler offered that his lies even have a modicum of truth or are factually based? His continual denial? Sorry Ziggy, you keep coming up empty here as well.

Ziggy can have (6) fricken degrees on his wall but that doesn’t mean a darn thing. You see, he lacks integrity, honesty and is driven only by his radical political ideology. He’s not an “educator” and lacks ANY righteous credentials to have the title “superintendent”. A superintendent used to garner respect and were taken very seriously. They were an authority on education that parents trusted. Now, at least in LCPS, our superintendent is a joke, not respected, and continues to mislead the parents of Loudoun.


Loudoun Now

Loudoun County Public Schools Superintendent Scott Ziegler highlighted the importance of a strong pipeline from the school district to Loudoun-based businesses and called on businesses to defend the shared value of equity during a Chamber of Commerce event Friday morning in Ashburn.

The PolicyMaker Series event, held at the Schools Administration Building, focused on the state of workforce recovery in the county and featured addresses from both Ziegler and Virginia Secretary of Labor Megan Healy, and was attended by dozens of lawmakers and business representatives from across the commonwealth. 

Ziegler highlighted several of the school district’s programs that he said are training and preparing productive citizens and members of the Loudoun County workforce, particularly in computer science. He also mentioned projects that his administration is eying for the next few years, including  international baccalaureate, fine arts, and study of justice programs.

He emphasized the changing demographics in county schools. Twenty-five years ago, over 80% of students were white. Since then, the population of the county has nearly quadrupled and students of color comprise the majority in the district, he said. The district’s equity work, including studies of hiring practices, treatment of students, and teacher trainings on race issues, have drawn criticism to the school district. Opponents of the district’s equity work say that Critical Race Theory is being applied to the district’s curriculum.

“Our detractors would have you believe that we are teaching and indoctrinating students with Critical Race Theory in our schools. That’s something that’s simply not happening,” Ziegler said. “What we in education call equity and equity training, which I define as the practice of acknowledging culture and respecting and affirming identity. It’s what you in business would call diversity training.”

He called on business leaders to affirm practices of racial equality and inclusion.

“I would challenge you as a group this morning to join us and speak up when our community and when our school system is attacked because of these values that we share,” he said.

Healy’s speech preceded Zielger’s and spoke to the challenges facing Virginia’s workforce as a result of the pandemic, and building the workforce for the future. She stressed the importance of providing paid internships, apprenticeships, and on-the-job training, especially to financially disadvantaged people and people of color.

“I always say you can’t be what you can’t see. … They do not have social capital,” Healy said.

But, accessing those minority groups is a goal of businesses, she said, and companies want not only a talented workforce, but a diverse workforce.

She emphasized that for businesses to come to Virginia and thrive, a capable workforce is crucial. That, she said, requires recruiting workers and implementing retention strategies. She cited shortages of teachers and healthcare workers coming out of the pandemic, and said that employers must incentivize and structure jobs to appeal to a changing world and changing family dynamics that make working a challenge for some parents.